Microsoft launches Skype Video Messages app for everything but Windows Phone

Microsoft-owned Skype has released a new app today called Video Messages. It allows users to send videos up to three minutes long to their friends. The app is available today for Mac, iOS, and Android. It is not available on any of Microsoft’s own platforms at launch.

This is becoming an issue for Microsoft. Many Windows Phone fans will argue that they don’t need this app, but that is not the point. This is the problem with large companies like Microsoft. Skype is essentially a company within a company. They have no incentive to develop for Windows and Windows Phone first. Their goal is to make products that get used a lot.¬†Unfortunately¬†the best way to do that is to spend time developing for platforms like iOS and Android. The same thing has happened with other Microsoft products, such as Photosynth. The Photosynth app has been updated for the iPhone 5 a while ago, but where is the Windows Phone 8 app? Once again, they have no incentive to develop for Windows Phone first.

We hate to see this type of unorganization inside Microsoft. They are in need of a big company-wide initiative to put their own products first. Making popular products for other platforms is not going to help Microsoft in the long term.

[via The Verge]


  • JSYOUNG571

    @Joe Fedewa. Do you see what I am talking about now when I say the worst thing that could have ever happend to Windows Phone was Microsoft…smh

  • robjackson81

    Talk about lack of focus… Microsoft should be leveraging Skype as a bonus for Windows Phone that Android and iOS don’t enjoy. The same way Google played their navigation and map cards on Android vs other platforms.

    Poor form, Microsoft, poor form.

  • Breakingillusions

    they already said they are preparing for big update 4 windows in April so this news is old

  • Edgar Cervantes

    Kinda like how Google many times releases things for iOS before Android. I just don’t get it!

  • http://josedmorales.net/ Joe Morales

    So much for 90,000 employees. Bah!